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"Justice is not a quantitative question. If you steal something for long enough it doesn’t become yours"
Kwame Ture (formerly Stokely Carmichael) on settler colonialism (via decolonizehistory)

We don’t need mandatory detention to make children show up in ICE courts (they already do)

As the number of unaccompanied children arriving at the United States border has increased, some lawmakers have argued that children frequently disappear into the woodwork, and propose mandatory detention as a solution. Some say as many as 90 percent fail to attend their immigration court hearings. Yet government data recently published by Syracuse University’s Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse (TRAC) may indicate the opposite. Not only do a majority of children attend their immigration proceedings, according to TRAC, but 90 percent or more attend when represented by lawyers.

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also, just look at how annoyed OPM looks with Obama. None of them are happy, tho…


Barack Obama (third left) speaks as Otto Perez Molina (second left) of Guatemala, Juan Orlando Hernandez (right) of Honduras, and Salvador Sanchez Ceren (left) of El Salvador listen in the Cabinet Room, 25 July 2014. Photograph: Rex




Three Central American leaders met President Obama on Friday to tell him that billions of dollars poured into attempting to prevent migrant children crossing the US border would be better spent addressing the root causes of the crisis in their countries.
The presidents of Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador urged the US administration to do more to combat the armed gangs and drug cartels responsible for the violence driving emigration that has seen more than 57,000 unaccompanied children from their countries arrive at the Texas border in recent months. The three leaders – Juan Orlando Hernández of Honduras, Otto Pérez Molina of Guatemala and Salvador Sánchez Cerén of El Salvador – urged the Obama administration to do more to address the destabilisation caused by cartels shipping narcotics to the American market, and to invest in more rapid economic development to relieve widespread poverty.
But in comments after the meeting, Obama stuck to Washington’s emphasis on a campaign to discourage what the White House called “irregular migration” with publicity campaigns and the pursuit of people smugglers.
"I emphasised that the American people and my administration have great compassion for these children," he said. "But I also emphasised to my friends that we have to deter a continuing influx of children putting themselves at risk."

also, just look at how annoyed OPM looks with Obama. None of them are happy, tho…

Barack Obama (third left) speaks as Otto Perez Molina (second left) of Guatemala, Juan Orlando Hernandez (right) of Honduras, and Salvador Sanchez Ceren (left) of El Salvador listen in the Cabinet Room, 25 July 2014. Photograph: Rex

Three Central American leaders met President Obama on Friday to tell him that billions of dollars poured into attempting to prevent migrant children crossing the US border would be better spent addressing the root causes of the crisis in their countries.

The presidents of GuatemalaHonduras and El Salvador urged the US administration to do more to combat the armed gangs and drug cartels responsible for the violence driving emigration that has seen more than 57,000 unaccompanied children from their countries arrive at the Texas border in recent months. The three leaders – Juan Orlando Hernández of Honduras, Otto Pérez Molina of Guatemala and Salvador Sánchez Cerén of El Salvador – urged the Obama administration to do more to address the destabilisation caused by cartels shipping narcotics to the American market, and to invest in more rapid economic development to relieve widespread poverty.

But in comments after the meeting, Obama stuck to Washington’s emphasis on a campaign to discourage what the White House called “irregular migration” with publicity campaigns and the pursuit of people smugglers.

"I emphasised that the American people and my administration have great compassion for these children," he said. "But I also emphasised to my friends that we have to deter a continuing influx of children putting themselves at risk."

Oops. I said that Obama went to Central America in that last post, but it was the other way around. Northern Triangle presidents went to the White House.

Excerpts from a letter to President Obama signed by more than 500 scholars of Central America (mostly, but not exclusively, based in the US). The letter was delivered just before Central American presidents visited the White House.

Dear Mr. President: 
As scholars of Central America and migration who are familiar with the conditions that cause so many children to flee their homelands, and mindful of the historical relationship between the United States and this region, we call on your administration to treat the “unaccompanied minors” at the border as refugees who are deserving of protection, due process, and humane treatment. We ask that they have access to legal representation by volunteer or government­ funded lawyers, in order for them to be reunited with relatives. Young migrants arriving from the Northern Triangle—Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras—face real and credible threats to their lives and safety in their hometowns. Further, many of them already have parents or other relatives living and working in the United States. Both the conditions of extreme insecurity in their homelands and the hardships of family separation dictate that these youth should be reunited with family members in the U.S. as swiftly as possible….
We want to emphasize that the United States is complicit in the conditions that cause so many to migrate. The reasons are many: U.S. historical support for military dictatorships and regimes of violence in the region; its promotion of free trade agreements and economic policies that have undermined subsistence agriculture and eroded public services, and its increasingly harsh immigration policies and practices that have separated families and deported too many whose livelihoods and security were in the United States. We have an opportunity and a responsibility now to make up for some past mistakes by offering humane treatment and consideration to the new arrivals and swiftly reuniting them with their family members.

"Mexico is moving its border security: before they were in the North, and now they are passing to the South. In fact, we think that soon the border for US security will no longer be Tijuana, but they will push it south to Tapachula."

— Jaime Flores, coordinator of Casa Alianza, who describes Mexico as a “fatal country for migrant children.”

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"Rather than something separate from or running counter to the colonial state, the murderous activities of the frontier rabble constitute its principle means of expansion… Characteristically, officials express regret at the lawlessness of this process while resigning themselves to its inevitability… The occasions on or the extent to which settler colonialism conduces to genocide are not a matter of the presence or absence of the formal apparatus of the state."
Wolfe, P. 2008. Structure and event: settler colonialism and the question of genocide. In Empire, Colony, Genocide: Settler colonialism and the question of genocide, ed. A. D. Moses, 102-132. Oxford: Berghahn Books.
espirituasesino:

White politicians are the biggest dipshits in the entire world.
espirituasesino:

White politicians are the biggest dipshits in the entire world.
espirituasesino:

White politicians are the biggest dipshits in the entire world.
espirituasesino:

White politicians are the biggest dipshits in the entire world.
espirituasesino:

White politicians are the biggest dipshits in the entire world.
espirituasesino:

White politicians are the biggest dipshits in the entire world.
espirituasesino:

White politicians are the biggest dipshits in the entire world.
espirituasesino:

White politicians are the biggest dipshits in the entire world.
espirituasesino:

White politicians are the biggest dipshits in the entire world.
espirituasesino:

White politicians are the biggest dipshits in the entire world.

espirituasesino:

White politicians are the biggest dipshits in the entire world.

U.S. Border Patrol agents detain undocumented immigrants some 60 miles north of the U.S.-Mexico border near Falfurrias, Texas. (John Moore—Getty Images)

"To challenge something that ‘just is,’ as many subaltern subjects have, can be a very threatening geographic act; it is punishable, erasable and oppositional."

McKittrick, K (2006) Demonic Grounds: Black women and the cartographies of struggle. University of Minnesota Press. p. 145 

Fewer than 25% of applications for asylum in Mexico are successful

~ infographic is for all people seeking asylum in Mexico, not just minors ~

"Mexican law recognizes two definitions of refugees: one, the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees, which is well-founded fear of persecution on the basis of race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group or political opinion,” explains Mónica Oehler, lawyer with the organization Sin Fronteras. “The other is the Cartagena definition of refugee, which establishes a refugee as a person who lives through a generalized violent conflict, a massive human rights violation and grave public disorder.”

image

"If a person fits with these two definitions, they can ask for recognition as a refugee. The problem —explains the lawyer— is that the Mexican authorities are not seeing it this way. For example, the Cartagena definition is not used, rather they use the other definition that corresponds to more specific cases and leave the others aside, because to use [the Cartagena definition] would mean that Mexico recognize that Honduras and El Salvador have a grave human rights violations problem, and this would be politically incorrect."

(Manuel Ureste | Anímal Político)

"Mexico ‘saves’ thousands of children only to throw them in jail" by Manuel Ureste. (photos & captions translated from top to bottom below)
"I didn’t kill anyone to get locked up" | Human Rights Center Father Matias de Cordova ran an exercise where they gave out notecards to children detained in the Siglo XXI station in Tapachula, in Mexico’s southern border in Chiapas, in which children expressed their lack of understanding about why they were locked up.
"Need to leave this cell" | Despite the fact that Article 112 of Mexico’s Migration law establishes that children may not be detained in migrant centers while their case is processed, Mexico has locked up thousands of children this year in these centers, which civil society organizations call jails.
(Elsewhere in the article) “Within the normative context of Article 112, there are various difficulties,” explains Elba Coria of the International Detention Coalition (IDC). “First, there is no capacity within DIF [Mexican family welfare agency] to receive all the migrant children. And second, DIF is only receiving children, when it does, up to 12 years of age. From 12 to 18 years of age, there are no standards of care.”
"I need to go" | Minors are also protected by the UN’s Convention on the Rights of the Child, which establishes that children should not be in conditions that deprive them of their liberty.
"My need: Help my parents in everything they need" | Thousands of children leave Central America every year, fleeing gangs and seeking a better future in the US, although an increasing number of youth and families seek refuge in Mexico.
"Mexico ‘saves’ thousands of children only to throw them in jail" by Manuel Ureste. (photos & captions translated from top to bottom below)
"I didn’t kill anyone to get locked up" | Human Rights Center Father Matias de Cordova ran an exercise where they gave out notecards to children detained in the Siglo XXI station in Tapachula, in Mexico’s southern border in Chiapas, in which children expressed their lack of understanding about why they were locked up.
"Need to leave this cell" | Despite the fact that Article 112 of Mexico’s Migration law establishes that children may not be detained in migrant centers while their case is processed, Mexico has locked up thousands of children this year in these centers, which civil society organizations call jails.
(Elsewhere in the article) “Within the normative context of Article 112, there are various difficulties,” explains Elba Coria of the International Detention Coalition (IDC). “First, there is no capacity within DIF [Mexican family welfare agency] to receive all the migrant children. And second, DIF is only receiving children, when it does, up to 12 years of age. From 12 to 18 years of age, there are no standards of care.”
"I need to go" | Minors are also protected by the UN’s Convention on the Rights of the Child, which establishes that children should not be in conditions that deprive them of their liberty.
"My need: Help my parents in everything they need" | Thousands of children leave Central America every year, fleeing gangs and seeking a better future in the US, although an increasing number of youth and families seek refuge in Mexico.
"Mexico ‘saves’ thousands of children only to throw them in jail" by Manuel Ureste. (photos & captions translated from top to bottom below)
"I didn’t kill anyone to get locked up" | Human Rights Center Father Matias de Cordova ran an exercise where they gave out notecards to children detained in the Siglo XXI station in Tapachula, in Mexico’s southern border in Chiapas, in which children expressed their lack of understanding about why they were locked up.
"Need to leave this cell" | Despite the fact that Article 112 of Mexico’s Migration law establishes that children may not be detained in migrant centers while their case is processed, Mexico has locked up thousands of children this year in these centers, which civil society organizations call jails.
(Elsewhere in the article) “Within the normative context of Article 112, there are various difficulties,” explains Elba Coria of the International Detention Coalition (IDC). “First, there is no capacity within DIF [Mexican family welfare agency] to receive all the migrant children. And second, DIF is only receiving children, when it does, up to 12 years of age. From 12 to 18 years of age, there are no standards of care.”
"I need to go" | Minors are also protected by the UN’s Convention on the Rights of the Child, which establishes that children should not be in conditions that deprive them of their liberty.
"My need: Help my parents in everything they need" | Thousands of children leave Central America every year, fleeing gangs and seeking a better future in the US, although an increasing number of youth and families seek refuge in Mexico.
"Mexico ‘saves’ thousands of children only to throw them in jail" by Manuel Ureste. (photos & captions translated from top to bottom below)
"I didn’t kill anyone to get locked up" | Human Rights Center Father Matias de Cordova ran an exercise where they gave out notecards to children detained in the Siglo XXI station in Tapachula, in Mexico’s southern border in Chiapas, in which children expressed their lack of understanding about why they were locked up.
"Need to leave this cell" | Despite the fact that Article 112 of Mexico’s Migration law establishes that children may not be detained in migrant centers while their case is processed, Mexico has locked up thousands of children this year in these centers, which civil society organizations call jails.
(Elsewhere in the article) “Within the normative context of Article 112, there are various difficulties,” explains Elba Coria of the International Detention Coalition (IDC). “First, there is no capacity within DIF [Mexican family welfare agency] to receive all the migrant children. And second, DIF is only receiving children, when it does, up to 12 years of age. From 12 to 18 years of age, there are no standards of care.”
"I need to go" | Minors are also protected by the UN’s Convention on the Rights of the Child, which establishes that children should not be in conditions that deprive them of their liberty.
"My need: Help my parents in everything they need" | Thousands of children leave Central America every year, fleeing gangs and seeking a better future in the US, although an increasing number of youth and families seek refuge in Mexico.

"Mexico ‘saves’ thousands of children only to throw them in jail" by Manuel Ureste. (photos & captions translated from top to bottom below)

"I didn’t kill anyone to get locked up" | Human Rights Center Father Matias de Cordova ran an exercise where they gave out notecards to children detained in the Siglo XXI station in Tapachula, in Mexico’s southern border in Chiapas, in which children expressed their lack of understanding about why they were locked up.

"Need to leave this cell" | Despite the fact that Article 112 of Mexico’s Migration law establishes that children may not be detained in migrant centers while their case is processed, Mexico has locked up thousands of children this year in these centers, which civil society organizations call jails.

(Elsewhere in the article) “Within the normative context of Article 112, there are various difficulties,” explains Elba Coria of the International Detention Coalition (IDC). “First, there is no capacity within DIF [Mexican family welfare agency] to receive all the migrant children. And second, DIF is only receiving children, when it does, up to 12 years of age. From 12 to 18 years of age, there are no standards of care.”

"I need to go" | Minors are also protected by the UN’s Convention on the Rights of the Child, which establishes that children should not be in conditions that deprive them of their liberty.

"My need: Help my parents in everything they need" | Thousands of children leave Central America every year, fleeing gangs and seeking a better future in the US, although an increasing number of youth and families seek refuge in Mexico.

salviprince:

[Central America]: The Children Who Haven’t Been Able to Leave. Please watch.

[América Central]: Los niños que no han podido irse.  Por favor mira esto.

High quality video with English subtitles.

I really like ElFaro.net, but why is UNFPA sponsoring this? The UN Population Fund and the political messages they send about the need for fewer children in poor countries makes me uncomfortable…

Asylum requests from Central America are skyrocketing, everywhere

The United States recorded the largest number of new asylum applications out of all countries of asylum, having received 85% of the total of new applications brought by individuals from [El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala] in 2012. The number of requests for asylum has likewise increased in countries other than the U.S. Combined, Mexico, Panama, Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Belize documented a 432% increase in the number of asylum applications lodged by individuals from El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala.

nota bene: People are not applying for asylum in the US because they think it’s the best country ever (i.e., American dream). They are applying for asylum in the US because it’s the closest country they can get to that they think might be safe from extortion, forced gang recruitment, and/or death threats.

"It is like someone has torn open an artery in Honduras and other Central American countries. Fear, grinding poverty and no future mean we are losing our lifeblood – our young people. If this continues to happen, the hearts of our nations will stop beating."
Cardinal Óscar Andrés Rodríguez Maradiaga of Honduras