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thisisfusion:

So far there has been a 77 percent jump in the number of unaccompanied girls caught at the border this fiscal year, according to Pew Research Center.

That’s a drastic increase, especially when compared with the only slight swell in the number of unaccompanied boys who have been apprehended.

image

Broken down further, the biggest difference in apprehensions between the genders happens among teenagers: 

image

The dire circumstances in these kids’ home countries might be to blame. When Fusion’s Jorge Ramos spoke with journalist Sonia Nazario about the dangers children face in Central American countries, she detailed threats of violence and rape.

These types of threats may account for the influx of young girls trying to cross the border.

The flood of immigrants crossing the border has created a humanitarian crisis, with politicians on both sides split over a solution.

As politicians continue to battle it out — possibly without any resolution — Central American leaders are converging on Washington. President Obama is slated to meet with the presidents of Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador Friday at the White House, according to The New York Times. 

During the meeting, he’ll reportedly push the leaders to do all they can to help stem the tide of migrant children coming to the U.S. 

"Mexico ‘saves’ thousands of children only to throw them in jail" by Manuel Ureste. (photos & captions translated from top to bottom below)
"I didn’t kill anyone to get locked up" | Human Rights Center Father Matias de Cordova ran an exercise where they gave out notecards to children detained in the Siglo XXI station in Tapachula, in Mexico’s southern border in Chiapas, in which children expressed their lack of understanding about why they were locked up.
"Need to leave this cell" | Despite the fact that Article 112 of Mexico’s Migration law establishes that children may not be detained in migrant centers while their case is processed, Mexico has locked up thousands of children this year in these centers, which civil society organizations call jails.
(Elsewhere in the article) “Within the normative context of Article 112, there are various difficulties,” explains Elba Coria of the International Detention Coalition (IDC). “First, there is no capacity within DIF [Mexican family welfare agency] to receive all the migrant children. And second, DIF is only receiving children, when it does, up to 12 years of age. From 12 to 18 years of age, there are no standards of care.”
"I need to go" | Minors are also protected by the UN’s Convention on the Rights of the Child, which establishes that children should not be in conditions that deprive them of their liberty.
"My need: Help my parents in everything they need" | Thousands of children leave Central America every year, fleeing gangs and seeking a better future in the US, although an increasing number of youth and families seek refuge in Mexico.
"Mexico ‘saves’ thousands of children only to throw them in jail" by Manuel Ureste. (photos & captions translated from top to bottom below)
"I didn’t kill anyone to get locked up" | Human Rights Center Father Matias de Cordova ran an exercise where they gave out notecards to children detained in the Siglo XXI station in Tapachula, in Mexico’s southern border in Chiapas, in which children expressed their lack of understanding about why they were locked up.
"Need to leave this cell" | Despite the fact that Article 112 of Mexico’s Migration law establishes that children may not be detained in migrant centers while their case is processed, Mexico has locked up thousands of children this year in these centers, which civil society organizations call jails.
(Elsewhere in the article) “Within the normative context of Article 112, there are various difficulties,” explains Elba Coria of the International Detention Coalition (IDC). “First, there is no capacity within DIF [Mexican family welfare agency] to receive all the migrant children. And second, DIF is only receiving children, when it does, up to 12 years of age. From 12 to 18 years of age, there are no standards of care.”
"I need to go" | Minors are also protected by the UN’s Convention on the Rights of the Child, which establishes that children should not be in conditions that deprive them of their liberty.
"My need: Help my parents in everything they need" | Thousands of children leave Central America every year, fleeing gangs and seeking a better future in the US, although an increasing number of youth and families seek refuge in Mexico.
"Mexico ‘saves’ thousands of children only to throw them in jail" by Manuel Ureste. (photos & captions translated from top to bottom below)
"I didn’t kill anyone to get locked up" | Human Rights Center Father Matias de Cordova ran an exercise where they gave out notecards to children detained in the Siglo XXI station in Tapachula, in Mexico’s southern border in Chiapas, in which children expressed their lack of understanding about why they were locked up.
"Need to leave this cell" | Despite the fact that Article 112 of Mexico’s Migration law establishes that children may not be detained in migrant centers while their case is processed, Mexico has locked up thousands of children this year in these centers, which civil society organizations call jails.
(Elsewhere in the article) “Within the normative context of Article 112, there are various difficulties,” explains Elba Coria of the International Detention Coalition (IDC). “First, there is no capacity within DIF [Mexican family welfare agency] to receive all the migrant children. And second, DIF is only receiving children, when it does, up to 12 years of age. From 12 to 18 years of age, there are no standards of care.”
"I need to go" | Minors are also protected by the UN’s Convention on the Rights of the Child, which establishes that children should not be in conditions that deprive them of their liberty.
"My need: Help my parents in everything they need" | Thousands of children leave Central America every year, fleeing gangs and seeking a better future in the US, although an increasing number of youth and families seek refuge in Mexico.
"Mexico ‘saves’ thousands of children only to throw them in jail" by Manuel Ureste. (photos & captions translated from top to bottom below)
"I didn’t kill anyone to get locked up" | Human Rights Center Father Matias de Cordova ran an exercise where they gave out notecards to children detained in the Siglo XXI station in Tapachula, in Mexico’s southern border in Chiapas, in which children expressed their lack of understanding about why they were locked up.
"Need to leave this cell" | Despite the fact that Article 112 of Mexico’s Migration law establishes that children may not be detained in migrant centers while their case is processed, Mexico has locked up thousands of children this year in these centers, which civil society organizations call jails.
(Elsewhere in the article) “Within the normative context of Article 112, there are various difficulties,” explains Elba Coria of the International Detention Coalition (IDC). “First, there is no capacity within DIF [Mexican family welfare agency] to receive all the migrant children. And second, DIF is only receiving children, when it does, up to 12 years of age. From 12 to 18 years of age, there are no standards of care.”
"I need to go" | Minors are also protected by the UN’s Convention on the Rights of the Child, which establishes that children should not be in conditions that deprive them of their liberty.
"My need: Help my parents in everything they need" | Thousands of children leave Central America every year, fleeing gangs and seeking a better future in the US, although an increasing number of youth and families seek refuge in Mexico.

"Mexico ‘saves’ thousands of children only to throw them in jail" by Manuel Ureste. (photos & captions translated from top to bottom below)

"I didn’t kill anyone to get locked up" | Human Rights Center Father Matias de Cordova ran an exercise where they gave out notecards to children detained in the Siglo XXI station in Tapachula, in Mexico’s southern border in Chiapas, in which children expressed their lack of understanding about why they were locked up.

"Need to leave this cell" | Despite the fact that Article 112 of Mexico’s Migration law establishes that children may not be detained in migrant centers while their case is processed, Mexico has locked up thousands of children this year in these centers, which civil society organizations call jails.

(Elsewhere in the article) “Within the normative context of Article 112, there are various difficulties,” explains Elba Coria of the International Detention Coalition (IDC). “First, there is no capacity within DIF [Mexican family welfare agency] to receive all the migrant children. And second, DIF is only receiving children, when it does, up to 12 years of age. From 12 to 18 years of age, there are no standards of care.”

"I need to go" | Minors are also protected by the UN’s Convention on the Rights of the Child, which establishes that children should not be in conditions that deprive them of their liberty.

"My need: Help my parents in everything they need" | Thousands of children leave Central America every year, fleeing gangs and seeking a better future in the US, although an increasing number of youth and families seek refuge in Mexico.

salviprince:

[Central America]: The Children Who Haven’t Been Able to Leave. Please watch.

[América Central]: Los niños que no han podido irse.  Por favor mira esto.

High quality video with English subtitles.

I really like ElFaro.net, but why is UNFPA sponsoring this? The UN Population Fund and the political messages they send about the need for fewer children in poor countries makes me uncomfortable…

Asylum requests from Central America are skyrocketing, everywhere

The United States recorded the largest number of new asylum applications out of all countries of asylum, having received 85% of the total of new applications brought by individuals from [El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala] in 2012. The number of requests for asylum has likewise increased in countries other than the U.S. Combined, Mexico, Panama, Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Belize documented a 432% increase in the number of asylum applications lodged by individuals from El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala.

nota bene: People are not applying for asylum in the US because they think it’s the best country ever (i.e., American dream). They are applying for asylum in the US because it’s the closest country they can get to that they think might be safe from extortion, forced gang recruitment, and/or death threats.

"It is like someone has torn open an artery in Honduras and other Central American countries. Fear, grinding poverty and no future mean we are losing our lifeblood – our young people. If this continues to happen, the hearts of our nations will stop beating."
Cardinal Óscar Andrés Rodríguez Maradiaga of Honduras
Photos from Anímal Político’s three part series (still working my way through, so more to come), roughly translated as “Underage migrants: Mexico closes the door on a generation fleeing violence.” The series focuses on youth headed north from the Northern Triangle (Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador) and their experiences in Mexico as they head north.
As one migrant notes in part one of the series, it is actually crossing through Mexico that is the most dangerous for would-be immigrants. There are about 52 informal crossing points between Guatemala and Mexico. As the photos demonstrate, many of those who ferry migrants and goods back and forth across the river are themselves underage youth. 
Photos from Anímal Político’s three part series (still working my way through, so more to come), roughly translated as “Underage migrants: Mexico closes the door on a generation fleeing violence.” The series focuses on youth headed north from the Northern Triangle (Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador) and their experiences in Mexico as they head north.
As one migrant notes in part one of the series, it is actually crossing through Mexico that is the most dangerous for would-be immigrants. There are about 52 informal crossing points between Guatemala and Mexico. As the photos demonstrate, many of those who ferry migrants and goods back and forth across the river are themselves underage youth. 
Photos from Anímal Político’s three part series (still working my way through, so more to come), roughly translated as “Underage migrants: Mexico closes the door on a generation fleeing violence.” The series focuses on youth headed north from the Northern Triangle (Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador) and their experiences in Mexico as they head north.
As one migrant notes in part one of the series, it is actually crossing through Mexico that is the most dangerous for would-be immigrants. There are about 52 informal crossing points between Guatemala and Mexico. As the photos demonstrate, many of those who ferry migrants and goods back and forth across the river are themselves underage youth. 
Photos from Anímal Político’s three part series (still working my way through, so more to come), roughly translated as “Underage migrants: Mexico closes the door on a generation fleeing violence.” The series focuses on youth headed north from the Northern Triangle (Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador) and their experiences in Mexico as they head north.
As one migrant notes in part one of the series, it is actually crossing through Mexico that is the most dangerous for would-be immigrants. There are about 52 informal crossing points between Guatemala and Mexico. As the photos demonstrate, many of those who ferry migrants and goods back and forth across the river are themselves underage youth. 
Photos from Anímal Político’s three part series (still working my way through, so more to come), roughly translated as “Underage migrants: Mexico closes the door on a generation fleeing violence.” The series focuses on youth headed north from the Northern Triangle (Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador) and their experiences in Mexico as they head north.
As one migrant notes in part one of the series, it is actually crossing through Mexico that is the most dangerous for would-be immigrants. There are about 52 informal crossing points between Guatemala and Mexico. As the photos demonstrate, many of those who ferry migrants and goods back and forth across the river are themselves underage youth. 
Photos from Anímal Político’s three part series (still working my way through, so more to come), roughly translated as “Underage migrants: Mexico closes the door on a generation fleeing violence.” The series focuses on youth headed north from the Northern Triangle (Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador) and their experiences in Mexico as they head north.
As one migrant notes in part one of the series, it is actually crossing through Mexico that is the most dangerous for would-be immigrants. There are about 52 informal crossing points between Guatemala and Mexico. As the photos demonstrate, many of those who ferry migrants and goods back and forth across the river are themselves underage youth. 
Photos from Anímal Político’s three part series (still working my way through, so more to come), roughly translated as “Underage migrants: Mexico closes the door on a generation fleeing violence.” The series focuses on youth headed north from the Northern Triangle (Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador) and their experiences in Mexico as they head north.
As one migrant notes in part one of the series, it is actually crossing through Mexico that is the most dangerous for would-be immigrants. There are about 52 informal crossing points between Guatemala and Mexico. As the photos demonstrate, many of those who ferry migrants and goods back and forth across the river are themselves underage youth. 
Photos from Anímal Político’s three part series (still working my way through, so more to come), roughly translated as “Underage migrants: Mexico closes the door on a generation fleeing violence.” The series focuses on youth headed north from the Northern Triangle (Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador) and their experiences in Mexico as they head north.
As one migrant notes in part one of the series, it is actually crossing through Mexico that is the most dangerous for would-be immigrants. There are about 52 informal crossing points between Guatemala and Mexico. As the photos demonstrate, many of those who ferry migrants and goods back and forth across the river are themselves underage youth. 
Photos from Anímal Político’s three part series (still working my way through, so more to come), roughly translated as “Underage migrants: Mexico closes the door on a generation fleeing violence.” The series focuses on youth headed north from the Northern Triangle (Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador) and their experiences in Mexico as they head north.
As one migrant notes in part one of the series, it is actually crossing through Mexico that is the most dangerous for would-be immigrants. There are about 52 informal crossing points between Guatemala and Mexico. As the photos demonstrate, many of those who ferry migrants and goods back and forth across the river are themselves underage youth. 
Photos from Anímal Político’s three part series (still working my way through, so more to come), roughly translated as “Underage migrants: Mexico closes the door on a generation fleeing violence.” The series focuses on youth headed north from the Northern Triangle (Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador) and their experiences in Mexico as they head north.
As one migrant notes in part one of the series, it is actually crossing through Mexico that is the most dangerous for would-be immigrants. There are about 52 informal crossing points between Guatemala and Mexico. As the photos demonstrate, many of those who ferry migrants and goods back and forth across the river are themselves underage youth. 

Photos from Anímal Político’s three part series (still working my way through, so more to come), roughly translated as “Underage migrants: Mexico closes the door on a generation fleeing violence.” The series focuses on youth headed north from the Northern Triangle (Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador) and their experiences in Mexico as they head north.

As one migrant notes in part one of the series, it is actually crossing through Mexico that is the most dangerous for would-be immigrants. There are about 52 informal crossing points between Guatemala and Mexico. As the photos demonstrate, many of those who ferry migrants and goods back and forth across the river are themselves underage youth. 

Courtesy of Humane Borders

This new map charts migrant deaths along the U.S./Mexico border.  The “death map" charts bodies found along U.S.-Mexico border with the hopes of improving knowledge of border traffic, influencing policy makers and helping humanitarian groups identify where resources should be targeted.

The Arizona OpenGIS Initiative for Deceased Immigrants may begin to reduce the deaths and help families of the missing recover the bones of their members. Aided by an anonymous $175,000 grant, the database based on information from the medical examiner, law enforcement agencies and research by Humane Borders took five years to develop. Advocates hope that by improving knowledge of border traffic they can influence policymakers and help humanitarian groups identify where they should target their resources.For

A forced return | un forzoso regreso

On Friday around noon a flight arrived from Mesa, Arizona, United States, with dozens of Guatemalan deportees, including seven children accompanied by adult family members (five girls ages 4, 6, 7, 12 and 16, and two boys 2 and 14). The arrival of children occurs amidst questions between the U.S. government and the countries of northern triangle of Central America (Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras) about the humanitarian crisis of thousands of unaccompanied minors detained trying to cross the border. 

Children and adults covered their faces to protect their identities, while they were received by authorities from the Attorney General’s Office, Vladimir Aguilar, and the Deputy Foreign Minister, Oscar Padilla. Aguilar gave a “warm welcome” to the deported families and assured that they would receive social assistance, while Padilla noted that the arrival of these children with their families “is something that happens every week.”

(Pláza Pública, original in Spanish)

aimexico:

La violencia contra las personas migrantes que viajan a través de nuestro país debe terminar ya. 

Exige un alto a la violencia e impunidad en: www.alzatuvoz.org/migrantes

adam-wola:

(Click to enlarge) The unaccompanied minors humanitarian crisis is remarkably concentrated in one part of the U.S.-Mexico border. While Border Patrol must process tens of thousands of children near Texas’s southernmost point, similar numbers of agents assigned to other sectors are facing the smallest migrant flow in 40 years.

We should question calls to increase Border Patrol still further, or even call in the National Guard, when so much capacity exists elsewhere along the border.

xingonaaaa:

rtamerica:

Nearly two-thirds of asylum requests by illegal immigrant children immediately granted

Despite promises from President Barack Obama that unaccompanied illegal immigrant children will be deported, nearly two-thirds of requests from minors seeking asylum in the US have been initially approved, according to a new report.

The US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) sent information to the House Judiciary Committee stating that 65 percent of the unaccompanied alien minors who had petitioned the US government for asylum were immediately granted approval, the legislative committee announced Friday.

Mmmmmm, I’m def gonna need more than what USCIS says. I don’t believe shit they say. What about indigenous children? Besides, judges are being instructed to tighten requirements for asylum. Denial rates for asylum are already extremely high, like almost no one gets it. 

So, no. This is just wrong. Russian Times, really? How does this article claim to cite official government statistics and not provide a link? Could it be that this is a gross misrepresentation? How shocking.

Here’s what I think this report is actually pulling from: According to the Vera Institute (a non-profit organization that conducted a study, not a government agency), in a study of children who were already sent to the Office of Refugee Resettlement (i.e., not subjected to expedited removal, etc), 65% were “reunified” with family while they awaited the outcome of their case, which takes on average close to two years.

If I am reading the study correctly, kids can age out at 18 if the ORR / USCIS doesn’t process their case and be subject to expedited removal. Seems like the USCIS can effectively penalize 17 year old potential refugees for its own inefficiency. Am I wrong on this? Anyone else reading this differently?

Overall, the number of applicants apprehended with credible fear has shot up, but the proportion of asylum granted has stayed the same over the past few years. According to the American Immigration Council:

While the numbers of asylum claimants from Central America and Mexico have increased, USCIS shows low numbers of affirmative asylum grants to Salvadorans, Guatemalans, Hondurans, and Mexicans from FY 2003 to FY 2012. Likewise, immigration courts granted similarly low numbers of defensive asylum claims during those same years. In FY 2012, immigration courts granted asylum at rates of 6% to Salvadoran applicants, 7% to Guatemalan, 7% to Honduran, and 1% to Mexican applications. These figures contrast with asylum grant rates of more than 80% to applicants from Egypt, Iran, and Somalia for the same period.

Note that the above are for all asylum claimants, not exclusive to unaccompanied minors. If anyone can offer a link to actual USCIS testimony or reports that are specific to unaccompanied minors, let me know, would love to see it!

update: This NYTimes article also claims that a draft plan states that 65% of unaccompanied minors (from Honduras? or all Central America?? unclear) who applied for asylum were approved. Again, I have my doubts, because the article links neither to the draft report nor the source of the 65% estimate. Meanwhile, the Vera Institute report estimated that about 40% of unaccompanied minors could qualify for asylum/humanitarian/etc status. That’s a pretty big difference.

Yes, indigenous children are detained at the US border (but are they interviewed in their own language?)

guatepolitics:

“It is surprisingly easy for gringos to look past the reality of undocumented migrants as human beings, and most gringos imagine immigrants as caramel-colored, Spanish-speaking Mexicans, not indigenous, Q’eqchi’-speaking Guatemalans.”

"Don’t Just Pay It Back, Pay It Forward: From Accountability to Reciprocity in Research Relationships" in the Journal of Research Practice

Seriously, though, I haven’t seen one single news article that acknowledges that some of the detained immigrants don’t speak Spanish, much less asks questions about the quality of credible fear determinations that are not conducted in immigrants’ native languages.

I was starting to wonder if my expectations for media representation were unreasonably high. Nope.

image

This isn’t the clearest graph I’ve ever seen, but here’s what this recent report from the United Nations High Commissioner on Refugees (UNHCR) reveals in its study of more than 400 unaccompanied minors who were held in US federal custody. Of 100 Guatemalan minors, more than 40 spoke one or more languages other than Spanish. The study did not sample for ethnicity (as it did for nationality & gender), but by chance 48% of Guatemalan children self-identified as indigenous (also ~5% of Mexican and 3% of Honduran children).

The study did not discuss whether any of these children spoke Spanish as a second language or whether interviews conducted in Spanish might miss key elements of claims for international protection / asylum.

chanclazo:

guatepolitics:

jopara:

chanclazo:

guatepolitics:

Many immigrants don’t even make it to the US border. With US financial and logistical support, Mexico is on track to deport more than 70,000 people this year, mostly from El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala.

Between this rise in migration and a heavy presence of organized crime and trafficking groups, this region is receiving greater attention from Mexico—and the United States. It was not a central geographic focus in the first years of the “Mérida Initiative,” the framework that has guided nearly US$2 billion in U.S. security aid to Mexico since 2008. Starting in about 2011, however, U.S. officials began regularly declaring intentions to increase assistance to help both Mexico and Guatemala beef up their border security measures. That year, the U.S. Defense Department quietly launched a “Mexico-Guatemala-Belize Border Region Program,” providing as much as US$50 million for “patrol boats, night vision equipment, communications equipment, maritime sensors, and associated training” from the Pentagon’s counter-drug budget. “The Guatemalan border with Chiapas is now our southern border,” Assistant Secretary of Homeland Security for International Affairs Alan Bersin has said.

I’m interested as to how these numbers are compiled. Do they mostly reflect apprehensions, stops, or removal actions at the border or do these also reflect formal removals by the Government of México from further in the interior. 

If so, under what mechanisms is this happening, as México has formally stated that it will not detain, harrass or remove migrants headed to a third party country after 2011. If the Government of México is acting contrary to its own stated laws and principles on migrants, then that’s a major issue Mexican nationals, esp undocumented folk, should take to their consulates abroad immediately. 

i was looking at the source links and thought since they used bit.ly links it might be shit but the links are actually real and are from huge ass PDFs if anyone is interested

[1] [2] [3]

Oooh, I don’t know much about this official statement by Mexican government, but I really doubt that this is informing practice. The infographic is from the Washington Office on Latin America (WOLA) / Adam Isacson — I don’t always love their data, but they tend to pull from official government statistics.

The above is from total national data for deportations (from Mexico), but I used it to critique Mexico’s southern border because of this part of the report:

Mexico is also apprehending more Central American migrants within its territory. According to statistics from the Mexican Secretariat of the Interior’s (Secretaría de Gobernación, SEGOB) Migration Policy Unit, Mexico detained 86,298 foreign individuals in 2013. The Secretariat’s National Migration Institute (INM), the principal agency charged with enforcing migration law and protecting migrants, returned or deported 93 percent of those detained (80,079, a slight increase over the 79,416 people deported in 2012.) Of those deported in 2013, nearly all came from Honduras (32,800), Guatemala (30,005), or El Salvador (14,427). Data from the first four months of 2014 indicate an approximate 9 percent one-year jump in Mexico’s deportations of migrants from these three countries.

The states closest to Mexico’s southern border, and those along the shortest route between Central America and the United States, saw the most returns and deportations. Chiapas, which includes the most densely populated border zones, was in first place with 43 percent of the 2013 total (34,252), followed by Veracruz, Tabasco, and Oaxaca. The southern border region also hosted the greatest number of coordinated federal and state operations to apprehend and detain (or in INM terminology, “to rescue”) migrants.

Yes, thank you, this answers what I was wondering about. It looks like the Mexican government isn’t using previous deportation procedures after the laws were ammended to “decriminalize migration and extend protections to migrants”. But, judging from the numbers, it’s probably now using the current laws to remove migrants who ask for (read: probably are coerced to sign) voluntary removal petitions or repatriation requests in the interest of their “safety”. 

Which I’m willing to bet is identical to the way the United States uses “voluntary” removal documents to expedite deportations. 

Ohhhh, you are so right! That’s why this graph brings together “returns” and “deportations.” Thanks for the link to the Ley de Migración amendment, I will definitely get my read on!!

jopara:

chanclazo:

guatepolitics:

Many immigrants don’t even make it to the US border. With US financial and logistical support, Mexico is on track to deport more than 70,000 people this year, mostly from El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala.

Between this rise in migration and a heavy presence of organized crime and trafficking groups, this region is receiving greater attention from Mexico—and the United States. It was not a central geographic focus in the first years of the “Mérida Initiative,” the framework that has guided nearly US$2 billion in U.S. security aid to Mexico since 2008. Starting in about 2011, however, U.S. officials began regularly declaring intentions to increase assistance to help both Mexico and Guatemala beef up their border security measures. That year, the U.S. Defense Department quietly launched a “Mexico-Guatemala-Belize Border Region Program,” providing as much as US$50 million for “patrol boats, night vision equipment, communications equipment, maritime sensors, and associated training” from the Pentagon’s counter-drug budget. “The Guatemalan border with Chiapas is now our southern border,” Assistant Secretary of Homeland Security for International Affairs Alan Bersin has said.

I’m interested as to how these numbers are compiled. Do they mostly reflect apprehensions, stops, or removal actions at the border or do these also reflect formal removals by the Government of México from further in the interior. 

If so, under what mechanisms is this happening, as México has formally stated that it will not detain, harrass or remove migrants headed to a third party country after 2011. If the Government of México is acting contrary to its own stated laws and principles on migrants, then that’s a major issue Mexican nationals, esp undocumented folk, should take to their consulates abroad immediately. 

i was looking at the source links and thought since they used bit.ly links it might be shit but the links are actually real and are from huge ass PDFs if anyone is interested

[1] [2] [3]

Oooh, I don’t know much about this official statement by Mexican government, but I really doubt that this is informing practice. The infographic is from the Washington Office on Latin America (WOLA) / Adam Isacson — I don’t always love their analysis, but they tend to pull from official government statistics.

The above is from total national data for deportations (from Mexico), but I used it to critique Mexico’s southern border because of this part of the report:

Mexico is also apprehending more Central American migrants within its territory. According to statistics from the Mexican Secretariat of the Interior’s (Secretaría de Gobernación, SEGOB) Migration Policy Unit, Mexico detained 86,298 foreign individuals in 2013. The Secretariat’s National Migration Institute (INM), the principal agency charged with enforcing migration law and protecting migrants, returned or deported 93 percent of those detained (80,079, a slight increase over the 79,416 people deported in 2012.) Of those deported in 2013, nearly all came from Honduras (32,800), Guatemala (30,005), or El Salvador (14,427). Data from the first four months of 2014 indicate an approximate 9 percent one-year jump in Mexico’s deportations of migrants from these three countries.

The states closest to Mexico’s southern border, and those along the shortest route between Central America and the United States, saw the most returns and deportations. Chiapas, which includes the most densely populated border zones, was in first place with 43 percent of the 2013 total (34,252), followed by Veracruz, Tabasco, and Oaxaca. The southern border region also hosted the greatest number of coordinated federal and state operations to apprehend and detain (or in INM terminology, “to rescue”) migrants.